Information & Democracy

  As citizens living in a democracy, we have a responsibility to stay informed about the issues that matter to us and to society. This is true all the time, but especially when we must make a meaningful choice at the ballot box. Where people were once the gatekeepers who decided what news audiences saw, […]

 

As citizens living in a democracy, we have a responsibility to stay informed about the issues that matter to us and to society. This is true all the time, but especially when we must make a meaningful choice at the ballot box.

Where people were once the gatekeepers who decided what news audiences saw, on social media that job belongs to computer programs. Social media algorithms work in such a way that we are more likely to see content that is similar to what we already like or agree with. Our social media feeds never give the whole picture.

In this lesson, students get a first-hand experience of filter bubbles, and how they can shape our opinions and actions.

 

Downloads & Links

Secondary

Lesson Plan (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)
Feed For Thought (available at newsliteracy.ca —Website developed by CIVIX)
Slide Deck: “Information & Democracy” (PPT) (Google Slides)
Activity: Sample Ballots (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)
Activity: 3-2-1 Exit Card (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)
Activity: Online Investigation (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)

Elementary

Lesson Plan (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)
Feed For Thought (available at newsliteracy.ca — Website developed by CIVIX)
Slide Deck: “Information & Democracy” (PPT) (Google Slides)
Activity: Sample Ballots (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)
Activity: Evaluating the Pros and Cons (PDF) (Word) (Google Drive)